The Poi-Leng festival popularly known as the Grand Chariot Festival is celebrated to pay obeisance to the departed monks as per Theravada Buddhist traditions.

Poi Leng

The Poi-Leng festival popularly known as the Grand Chariot Festival is celebrated to pay obeisance to the departed monks as per Theravada Buddhist traditions. The monks and villagers decide the day to observe the celebration and accordingly a committee is formed to overlook the celebration. The mortal remains of the monks are installed on an artistically designed chariot and pulled by monks and devotees on either side thus symbolizing the participation in the last journey of the departed monks. Their mortal remains are embalmed using wax and tobacco for preservation before being kept in the coffin. Later it is kept in a makeshift stilt hut called the Kyong-Niban till the commencement of the festival. On the day of festival, the mortal remains of the monks are brought out from the Kyong-Niban and installed on the chariot (catafalque).  After that a mass prayer is held before the chariot.

 

Poi Pee Mau Pantomime: The New Year of the Tais

Poi Pee Mau - a New Year festival- is the celebration of the advent of a new dawn for the Tai community to usher a fresh era of socio-cultural development and is of paramount importance in uniting all Tais.

Festivals of the Tai Khamtis

Mai Ko Sum Fai  is a ritual ceremony  held on the full moon day of Magha connected with the worship of  fire. A stupa like shape structure is made up with stack of fire wood.

SANGKEN- The festival of Water

Sangken - the water festival - Sangken festival, which falls in the fifth month of Noun Ha in the lunar calendar coinciding with the Gregorian month of April, bids goodbye to the old year and ushers in the new year.

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